Google Search

Custom Search

Friday, August 2, 2013

Skin health and foods that are good for your skin – Recipe for Cioppino Stew

Your skin is the largest organ in your body, but it isn't as durable as you might think. It is susceptible to damage from within and from the environment. Your body uses nutrients from the foods you eat and drink to help you take care of and repair your skin. Certain foods can provide particular benefits and maximize your skins elasticity.

While genetics largely determines your skin's appearance, environmental damage and lifestyle choices can also affect your skin's health. Too much exposure to the sun, eating too much fat and junk food, smoking and alcohol consumption can cause damage to your skin.

Regular exercise can improve your skins elasticity. Try to get at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise to improve your skins health. Also, eat a diet rich in antioxidants. These nutrients help fight against free radicals and defend your skin cells against the damage caused by oxidative stress. Drink lots of water, stay hydrated. Adult males 19 to 50 should consume a minimum of 13 8-oz glasses of water daily and adult females, a minimum of 9 8-oz glasses.
You can eat your way to healthier skin by focusing on foods that are high in Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Beta-carotene, Selenium and Omega-3 Fatty Acids. Foods high in antioxidants that can protect your skin, including blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, cranberries, green leafy vegetables, and yellow- or orange-colored fruits and vegetables

My focus is on keeping healthy from the inside out, but it is still important to think about using moisturizers, sun screens, aloe vera lotion, etc. Try making a lotion by mixing castor oil with lemon juice, almond oil and/or essential oils such as lavender. Avoid soaps and body washes with Sulfates. Try masks, salt scrubs or loofah scrubs to help increase blood flow and remove dead skin. Remember to exercise and stay hydrated.

If you have one of these skin problems, these are some foods that can be helpful.

Acne:
Eat Yogurt
Vitamin A – Sweet Potatoes, Spinach, Kale, Carrots, Cantaloupe, Red Bell Peppers,
Red Chili Peppers, Asparagus, Apricots
Zinc – Oysters, Blue Crab, Turkey, Sirloin, Pork Loin, Ricotta, Spinach
Omega-3 Fatty Acids – Wild Salmon, Herring, Mackerel, Sardines, Anchovies, Flax Seeds, Walnuts, Soy Beans


Dry, Dull Skin:
Drink plenty of water
Omega-3 Fatty Acids – Wild Salmon, Herring, Mackerel, Sardines, Anchovies, Flax Seeds, Walnuts, Soy Beans
Niacin – Chicken, Tuna, Sirloin, Pork Loin, Corn Meal
Biotin (a B Vitamin) – Eggs, Avocado, Salmon

Signs of Aging:
Vitamin A - Sweet Potatoes, Spinach, Kale, Carrots, Cantaloupe, Red Bell Peppers,
Red Chili Peppers, Asparagus, Apricots
Vitamin C – Red Bell Peppers, Broccoli, Strawberries, Papaya, Pineapples, Kiwi,
Cantaloupe, Cauliflower, Mangoes, Oranges, Snow Peas, Tomatoes, Watermelon
Vitamin E – Whole-grain Cereals, Nuts, Seeds, Olive Oil, Spinach, Swiss Chard
Polyphenols – Green Tea, Cocoa, Chocolate
Antioxidants – (such as Lutein) – Spinach, Broccoli, Egg Yolks

Skin Elasticity:
Drink plenty of water
Eat protein rich foods – Cottage Cheese, Milk, Legumes, Tofu, Nuts, Fish
Eat foods in the Allium Family - Onions, Garlic, Chives, Leeks, Shallots, Scallions
Vitamin C – Red Bell Peppers, Broccoli, Strawberries, Papaya, Pineapple, Kiwi,
Cantaloupe, Cauliflower, Mangoes, Oranges, Pineapples, Snow Peas, Tomatoes, Watermelon
Selenium – Tuna, Crab, Oysters, Whole-Wheat Pasta, Lean Beef, Shrimp, Whole-Wheat Bread, Turkey, Wheat Germ, Chicken Breast, Mushrooms and Eggs
Copper - Brazil Nuts, Molasses, Sunflower Seeds, Green Olives, Avocados, Mushrooms, Pineapples, Prunes, Tomatoes, Sweet Potatoes, Tofu, Oysters
Zinc – Almonds, Beans, Oysters, Blue Crab, Turkey, Sirloin, Pork Loin, Ricotta, Seeds, Mushrooms, Lentils, Pomegranate, Spinach
Antioxidants – (such as Lutein) – Spinach, Broccoli, Egg Yolks

Sun Damage:
Eat Pomegranates
Vitamin C – Red Bell Peppers, Broccoli, Strawberries, Papaya, Pineapple, Kiwi,
Cantaloupe, Cauliflower, Mangoes, Oranges, Pineapples, Snow Peas, Tomatoes, Watermelon
Vitamin E – Whole-grain Cereals, Nuts, Seeds, Olive Oil, Spinach, Swiss Chard
Beta-carotene – Apricots, Cantaloupes, Carrots, Red Bell Peppers, Mangoes, Pumpkin, Sweet Potato
Omega-3 Fatty Acids – Wild Salmon, Herring, Mackerel, Sardines, Anchovies, Flax Seeds, Walnuts, Soy Beans
Selenium – Tuna, Crab, Oysters, Whole-Wheat Pasta, Lean Beef, Shrimp, Whole-Wheat Bread, Turkey, Wheat Germ, Chicken Breast, Mushrooms and Eggs

After finishing this list I couldn't help but think about a meal I had a couple of weeks ago – it was Cioppino Stew at Rosa's Little Italy in Bisbee, AZ. Pronounced chuh-pee-no, Cioppino is considered San Francisco's signature dish, it's an Italian-American fish stew and is related to regional fish soups and stews of Italy. It was developed by San Francisco fishermen in the late 1800's and it's thought that the name Cioppino comes from either the word ciuppin, meaning “to chop” or “chopped” or from the Italian accented English for “chip in”, meaning to chip in some of the catch for a collective soup pot at the end of the day. Interestingly, there is a similar soup in Genoa called Ciuppin.

So, what's so wonderful about this dish? It's that it contains a lot of different kinds of fish and shellfish and there are tons of different recipes for it all depending on what people has on hand or caught that day. This means that you can play with the recipe quite a bit and still end up with a delicious and healthy meal. So here's a basic recipe:

Cioppino Stew
1/3 c olive oil
2 medium onion, chopped
6 cloves garlic, minced
½ c fresh parsley leaves, minced
2 (14.5-ounce) cans no salt added plum tomatoes undrained and cut up
1 (8-ounce) bottle clam juice
2 bay leaves
1 tsp dried basil leaves
½ tsp dried thyme
1 tsp dried oregano
1 1/2 c dry white wine
12 small hard-shell clams in shell
12 mussel in shell
1 1/2 pounds raw extra-large shrimp, peeled and deveined*
1 1/2 pounds sea scallops
1 1/2 pounds salmon, cut into bite-size chunks
1 1/2 cups flaked crab meatSalt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1 c red peppers, diced
1 c water
1 tsp red pepper flakes
¼ c lemon juice

In a large soup pot or cast-iron Dutch oven over medium-low heat, add olive oil, onions, garlic, pepper and parsley. Cook slowly, stirring occasionally, until onions are softened. Add tomatoes, clam juice, water, bay leaves, basil, thyme, oregano, and wine; bring just to a boil, then reduce heat to low; cover, and simmer approximately 45 minutes to 1 hour. If sauce gets too thick add additional water or wine.

Scrub clams and mussels with a small stiff brush under cold running water; remove beards from mussels. Discard any open clams or mussels. Cover with cold salted water; let stand 5 minutes and then pour off the salted water.

Gently stir in the clams, mussels, shrimp, scallops, fish fillets, and crab meat to the prepared stock. Cover and simmer 5 to 7 minutes until clams pop open and shrimp are opaque when cut. NOTE: Do not overcook the seafood (the seafood continues to cook after it is removed from the pan). Remove bay leaves; season with salt and pepper to taste. Remove from from heat, stir in lemon juice and ladle broth and seafood into large soup bowls and serve.
Makes 10 servings.

*To add additional flavor, place the shells of the shrimp in a saucepan and cover with water. Simmer over low heat approximately 7 to 10 minutes. remove from heat and strain the broth; discarding shells. Add shrimp broth to soup broth. I often save shrimp shells in a zip lock bag in the freezer to make a seafood stock for gumbo.

I'm thinking that to add some additional nutritional value to this dish you could throw in a bunch of spinach, mushrooms, diced sweet potatoes (without the pasta) and serve the dish over some whole-wheat pasta. I had trouble figuring the nutritional data on this recipe – I believe that the sodium is not really this high, but it may be. Be careful if you are on a low sodium diet with what you pair this dish with and how much sodium you consume the rest of the day.

Nutritional Data for Cioppino Stew – Serves 8
Calories 513
Fat 17.8 g
Saturated Fat 2.3 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 4.4 g
Monounsaturated Fat 7.6 g
Cholesterol 196 mg
Sodium 612 mg
Potassium 1,405 mg
Carbohydrate 20 g
Dietary Fiber 2.7 g
Sugars 5.8 g
Protein 64 g
Vitamin A 111.4%
Vitamin C 37.2%
Calcium 27.7%
Iron 19.3%

If you enjoyed this article or this blog – click on the “Subscribe” link below.

1 comment:

  1. Sounds great! I love that they have a dish I can eat! The ingredients are such that I would be better off economically to go to Rosa's and buy a bowl, I believe.

    BTW...this particular article is very well done. Love the little illustrations. You're really getting good on this blog!

    ReplyDelete